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llinois Income Share Model: How to Calculate Child Support as of July 1, 2017

On July 1, 2017, the Illinois Income Share Model will go into effect and substantially change the way we calculate child support today. Up until July 1, 2017, only the net income of the non-majority parent (or non-custodial parent) is used to calculate child support. Currently, net income is defined as total of all income from all sources minus various deductions such as Federal income tax, State income tax, Social Security, mandatory retirement contributions, union dues, health insurance premiums and court ordered obligations. Once a parent’s net income is calculated, the non-custodial parent pays a percentage of his net income as for child support depending upon the amount of children he or she must support (one child=20%; two children=28%; three children=28%; four children=40%). The new income share model will still rely upon a determination of a parent’s net income; however, the definition of net income will be modified. Moreover, the new model will also consider the income of both parents in determining what share of child support each parent must pay. Moreover, the new law has developed two separate charts: 1) to calculate a parent’s net income and 2) to calculate the amount of child support required for a child (or children) based upon the total combined net income of both parents. Click below to see charts.

Gross to Net Income Conversion Table

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As of July 1, 2017, Public act 099-0764 will thereby amend section 5 to the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act (also known as the IMDMA). The IMDMA is the statute or law that specifies and dictates how child support is to be calculated and collected in Illinois along with other provisions as to the support of any minor children that are the subject of a court matter. Regardless of whether a person is facing a Dissolution of Marriage or a Paternity Action, the new law is set to radically change how we calculate child support today.

Currently, child support is calculated by generally considering a non-majority or non-custodial parent’s net income. Net income is generally considered whatever income a parent earns after various deductions are applied such as Federal, State, Social Security and Medicaid taxes. Once a parent’s net income is determined, the parent pays a determined amount of percentage as for child support that is dependent upon the amount of minor children (one child=20%; two children=28%; three children=28%; four children=40%).

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